Class 11 Maths Revision Notes for Chapter-1 Sets

Class 11 Maths Revision Notes for Sets of Chapter 1 – Free PDF Download

Free PDF download of Class 11 Maths revision notes & short key-notes for Sets of Chapter 1 to score high marks in exams, prepared by expert mathematics teachers from latest edition of CBSE books

Chapter Name Sets
Chapter Chapter 1
Class Class 11
Subject Maths Revision Notes
Board CBSE
TEXTBOOK MatheMatics
Category REVISION NOTES

CBSE Class 11 Maths Revision Notes for Sets of Chapter 1


Set
A set is a well-defined collection of objects.
Representation of Sets
There are two methods of representing a set

  • Roster or Tabular form In the roster form, we list all the members of the set within braces { } and separate by commas.
  • Set-builder form In the set-builder form, we list the property or properties satisfied by all the elements of the sets.

Types of Sets – Class 11 Maths Notes

  • Empty Sets: A set which does not contain any element is called an empty set or the void set or null set and it is denoted by {} or Φ.
  • Singleton Set: A set consists of a single element, is called a singleton set.
  • Finite and infinite Set: A set which consists of a finite number of elements, is called a finite set, otherwise the set is called an infinite set.
  • Equal Sets: Two sets A and 6 are said to be equal, if every element of A is also an element of B or vice-versa, i.e. two equal sets will have exactly the same element.
  • Equivalent Sets: Two finite sets A and 6 are said to be equal if the number of elements are equal, i.e. n(A) = n(B)

Subset – Class 11 Maths Notes

A set A is said to be a subset of set B if every element of set A belongs to set B. In symbols, we write
A ⊆ B, if x ∈ A ⇒ x ∈ B
Note:

  • Every set is o subset of itself.
  • The empty set is a subset of every set.
  • The total number of subsets of a finite set containing n elements is 2n.

Intervals as Subsets of R
Let a and b be two given real numbers such that a < b, then

  • an open interval denoted by (a, b) is the set of real numbers {x : a < x < b}.
  • a closed interval denoted by [a, b] is the set of real numbers {x : a ≤ x ≤ b}.
  • intervals closed at one end and open at the others are known as semi-open or semi-closed interval and denoted by (a, b] is the set of real numbers {x : a < x ≤ b} or [a, b) is the set of real numbers {x : a ≤ x < b}.

Power Set
The collection of all subsets of a set A is called the power set of A. It is denoted by P(A). If the number of elements in A i.e. n(A) = n, then the number of elements in P(A) = 2n.
Universal Set
A set that contains all sets in a given context is called the universal set.
Venn-Diagrams
Venn diagrams are the diagrams, which represent the relationship between sets. In Venn-diagrams the universal set U is represented by point within a rectangle and its subsets are represented by points in closed curves (usually circles) within the rectangle.
Operations of Sets
Union of sets: The union of two sets A and B, denoted by A ∪ B is the set of all those elements which are either in A or in B or in both A and B. Thus, A ∪ B = {x : x ∈ A or x ∈ B}.
Intersection of sets: The intersection of two sets A and B, denoted by A ∩ B, is the set of all elements which are common to both A and B.
Thus, A ∩ B = {x : x ∈ A and x ∈ B}
Disjoint sets: Two sets Aand Bare said to be disjoint, if A ∩ B = Φ.
Intersecting or Overlapping sets: Two sets A and B are said to be intersecting or overlapping if A ∩ B ≠ Φ
Difference of sets: For any sets A and B, their difference (A – B) is defined as a set of elements, which belong to A but not to B.
Thus, A – B = {x : x ∈ A and x ∉ B}
also, B – A = {x : x ∈ B and x ∉ A}
Complement of a set: Let U be the universal set and A is a subset of U. Then, the complement of A is the set of all elements of U which are not the element of A.
Thus, A’ = U – A = {x : x ∈ U and x ∉ A}
Some Properties of Complement of Sets

  • A ∪ A’ = ∪
  • A ∩ A’ = Φ
  • ∪’ = Φ
  • Φ’ = ∪
  • (A’)’ = A

Symmetric difference of two sets: For any set A and B, their symmetric difference (A – B) ∪ (B – A)
(A – B) ∪ (B – A) defined as set of elements which do not belong to both A and B.
It is denoted by A ∆ B.
Thus, A ∆ B = (A – B) ∪ (B – A) = {x : x ∉ A ∩ B}.

Laws of Algebra of Sets – Class 11 Maths Notes

Idempotent Laws: For any set A, we have

  • A ∪ A = A
  • A ∩ A = A

Identity Laws: For any set A, we have

  • A ∪ Φ = A
  • A ∩ U = A

Commutative Laws: For any two sets A and B, we have

  • A ∪ B = B ∪ A
  • A ∩ B = B ∩ A

Associative Laws: For any three sets A, B and C, we have

  • A ∪ (B ∪ C) = (A ∪ B) ∪ C
  • A ∩ (B ∩ C) = (A ∩ B) ∩ C

Distributive Laws: If A, B and Care three sets, then

  • A ∪ (B ∩ C) = (A ∪ B) ∩ (A ∪ C)
  • A ∩ (B ∪ C) = (A ∩ B) ∪ (A ∩ C)

De-Morgan’s Laws: If A and B are two sets, then

  • (A ∪ B)’ = A’ ∩ B’
  • (A ∩ B)’ = A’ ∪ B’

Formulae to Solve Practical Problems on Union and Intersection of Two Sets
Let A, B and C be any three finite sets, then

  • n(A ∪ B) = n(A) + n (B) – n(A ∩ B)
  • If (A ∩ B) = Φ, then n (A ∪ B) = n(A) + n(B)
  • n(A – B) = n(A) – n(A ∩ B)
  • n(A ∪ B ∪ C) = n(A) + n(B) + n(C) – n(A ∩ B) – n(B ∩ C) – n(A ∩ C) + n(A ∩ B ∩ C)

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